“Prioritizing These Three Things Will Improve Your Life — And Maybe Even Save It” - The Washington Post, April 28, 2017
Three simple ideas could go a long way in helping us live better lives: (1) Face-to-face social interaction (not texting or emails) leads to a longer life; (2) Knowing when to turn off your smartphone enriches your life (they’ve taken away our “stopping cues” – contrary to a book or a movie, scrolling on the phone is endless and we don’t know when to break away); (3) Chasing meaning, not happiness, is what really matters (meaning can be derived from belonging, purpose, transcendence and storytelling).

“Darwin Was a Slacker and You Should Be Too” - Nautilus, March 30, 2017
Famous scientists and artists only spent a few hours a day doing their most important work. The rest of the time, they were hiking mountains, taking naps, going on walks with friends, or just sitting and thinking. In short, their creativity and productivity were not the result of endless hours of toil, but instead resulted from modest “working” hours. The lesson for us: Even in today’s always-on world, we can blend work and rest in ways that make us smarter, more creative and happier. 

“Exercise 'Keeps the Mind Sharp' in Over-50s, Study Finds” - BBC, April 26, 2017
Doing moderate exercise several times a week is the best way to keep the mind sharp if you're over 50, research suggests.

“10 Steps for Staying Calm and De-Stressing” - World Economic Forum, April 7, 2017
The author of Emotional Intelligence 2.0 shares 10 strategies/tips to better cope with stress.

“Drinking Four Cups of Coffee Is Probably Safe” - The Atlantic, April 27, 2017
The most comprehensive review of evidence on the health consequences of caffeine use has just been published.

 

A Striking Stat: Run for Your Life

One hour of running statistically lengthens life expectancy by seven hours, no matter what the pace or mileage, making it the single most effective exercise to increase life expectancy.

 

Source: Cooper Institute Study, April 2017

Posted
AuthorBeth McGroarty, Director of Research, GWI